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Editorial Archive


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My Own Private Artspeak
Everybody claims to hate artspeak, and most of us art critics will offer full-throated denials that we sink to using it. Anyone who writes about art professionally is bound to use certain words and phrases that strike lay ears as esoteric. More...


Never Look Away
The recent film "Never Look Away," loosely based on the life of Gerhard Richter, traces an artist's complex journey from repression to freedom. More...


Dancing Across Genres, Medium Serving Message
When artists have something intensely personal to express, sometimes they do so in a medium different from the one they're most associated with. Richard Speer cites painter Sherrie Wolf's dance choreography and Marne Lucas' shift from photography to film as exceptional examples of just such a leap. More...


The Pros and Cons of Juried Exhibitions
If juried exhibitions offer emerging artists for exposure oapotuntites, they also can place them at the mercy of unscrupulous operators. More...


Charles White
Currently the subject of a LACMA retrospective, Charles White's aesthetic progeny are popping up elsewhere around L.A. to amplify his message. More...


In Praise of Art Criticism
Serious journalism in general and art criticism in particular has honestly never been very lucrative, but it may be more important than ever. More...


Performance Art is Where Liberal Humanism Thrives
That stuff that's not really performance art is being called performance art, argues Lisa Wainwright, ignores the context of its emergence and direction over the last half century. It has from the start been an expression of the tradition of liberal humanism. More...


A Tale of Two Art Sites
Between the recently opened Ed Paschke Art Center and the much ballyhooed Lucas Museum of Narrative of Art to be opened in four years, which do you suppose tells us more about Chicago? More...


A Beautiful Mess
Moving away from the crowded galleries of a blockbuster museum show can lead to unexpected rewards, as Maria Porges recently learned. More...


Art Films
With the recent release of attention grabbing films set in or about the art world, DeWitt Cheng offers a "best of" selection of such films styled as satire, drama and documentary.. More...


What I Didn’t Take Pictures of in Nepal
Leery of social media's trivializing effects he may be, but Richard Speer concedes that it has raised public awareness of the visual realm. On a recent stay in the Himalayas he found plenty of things to photograph and post, but also learned something about what not to photograph. More...


Painting for the Green New Deal
The final exhibition at the now defunct Pasadena Museum of California Art focused on a revision of the traditional landscape through the sensibilities of a selection of female artists. More...


Two Novels for Millennials
Evelyn Waugh's novel "Vile Bodies" (1930) follows a circle of post-WWI twenty somethings; while Dawn Powell's "The Golden Spur" (1962) follows another twenty something from rural Ohio to Greenwich Village after WWII in two books that Matthew Kangas finds well targeted for today's millennials. More...


That Minimalist Wall
There is the idea being discussed of turning Trump’s Great Wall into a monument to folly, greed and stupidity. Screw the wall, save the prototypes. More...


Civics Lesson from a Mural
A group recently sought to have a mural located at a Los Angeles school painted out because it reminded them of the Japanese battle flag, More...


Art and Houseplants
Richard Speer visits some Portland businesses that take their art seriously, not just using it for ambience, but with real curatorial intent and with artists sporting solid art world resumés. More...


Black and Blue
David S. Rubin finds new and unexpected insights to the art of Alexander Calder and Betye Saar in their recent exhibitions. More...


Melting Pot Aesthetics
In direct contrast to the current political tribalism, key artists have been freely and effectively blending racial and cultural signifiers. More...


“Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy”
Ragnar Kjartansson's recent durational performance "Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy" posted 30 women throughout San Francisco's Women's Building, each performing familiar songs with casually misogynistic lyrics. More...


Portland Evolves from Figure to Field
Visiting from Seattle, Matthew Kangas explores the unique virtues of Portland's current scene, starting with its one but singular major art museum, the popular Pearl District galleries, and the upstart Northeast district across the river. More...

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